Team Culture Taking a Hit? Try Creative Interventions.

Gil Gershoni
8 min readSep 23, 2020

A pirate ship with sails crafted entirely of espresso. That’s what Zelia, our account manager, shared in response to the prompt Create a finger painting using any material you have on hand. My laugh at the dark-roast plank coming off the stern upstages the story she’s telling about it on our agency-wide Zoom call. I surprise even myself with how I feel the tension in my jaw relax. My attention darts to the other thumbnails — strategists, designers and project managers at Gershoni — who have had a similar feeling of amusement and connection. Possibly, even you have a small sense of relief just hearing about it. That’s what play can do. And it’s why our agency started Creative Interventions, a series of midday mini-experiments in productivity, community and flow.

We asked ourselves: Can intermittent distractions actually make teams more focused?

Answer: Yes. And more fun, too.

Let’s face it: Working from home can be frustrating. We’re parked at our kitchen tables, with little sense of belonging and few avenues for self-expression. In early April, we saw a sort of lethargy take hold in our internal Zooms as the chatter of days past began to peter out. Our collective energy level was at a low. This comes as no surprise to you. Or to the people on your team.

What does come as a surprise is that few leaders see that as a business problem. And let’s be clear: That’s what it is.

Our attitudes are assets. It’s a key way a business can increase the value of a Zoom brainstorm or a client call.

Others may solve WFH strife with a SWOT analysis and HR conversations. Or, more likely, no solve at all. I, however, have always turned to what I’ve come to acknowledge as my hyper-ability.

Submissions to Week 6’s Creative Intervention prompt

Dyslexic Design Thinking

As a dyslexic, the way I…

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Gil Gershoni

Founder and creative director, Gershoni Creative. Frequently speaks on dyslexia and its impact on problem solving, design thinking and workplace collaboration.